Eugénia da Conceição-Heldt

Chair, European and Global Governance, School of Governance, Technical University of Munich

I’m the founding dean of the TUM School of Governance and hold the chair of European and Global Governance at the Technical University of Munich. My research interests include the delegation of power to international organizations, European integration, global economic governance (World Bank and WTO), two-level games, negotiation analysis, as well as power and accountability in European and global governance. I have co-edited (with Sophie Meunier) of a Journal of European of Public Policy special issue “Speaking with a Single Voice: the EU as an effective actor in global governance”, which looks at how internal cohesiveness of the EU determines its external effectiveness. In my recent book on the Future of the European Union examines the conditions, under which the current political, institutional, and economic crisis can be solved. I am currently preparing a special issue (with Sophie Meunier) of the premier peer reviewed journal in the field of International political economy, Review of International Political Economy, on the Legacies and Innovations of the Bretton Woods System to be published in 2019, when it turns 75. Recent articles have appeared in Journal of Common Market Studies, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, Journal of European Public Policy, Negotiation Journal, International Negotiations, International Relations, and Global Policy. Her current projects analyze processes of empowerment of international organizations, including the European Central Bank, agency slack in international bureaucracies, and legacies and innovations in global economic governance. She has received several prestigious awards for her research, including the Heisenberg fellowship from the German Science Foundation, the Jean Monnet fellowship at the European University Institute, the Calouste Gulbenkian fellowship at the School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University and a consolidator grant from the European Research Council. She has been a visiting scholar at the Center for European Studies (Harvard University), European University Institute, Social Science Research Center Berlin, Carleton University in Ottawa, and Free University Berlin. Currently, I am working on new research projects, including one on disruptive politics and technology, as well as on global technology governance. This includes a) mapping the evolution of global technology governance; b) explain the rise of regime complexity in global technology cooepration.